If you like dashiki-wearing rappers, bleach and ammonia mixing rappers, teenage rappers, dad rappers, and an indie-folk guy who will most definitely steal your girlfriend, then you’ve most definitely found yourself in the right place.

The Starlite Lounge hosted a showcase featuring local musicians on March 11th that somehow encompassed all of the above into one glorious night.

Comedian Edgar Granados kicked off the show with his unique half observational, half confessional routine. Granados has developed a reputation in Sacramento as being the comedian that isn’t afraid to push boundaries.

Comedian Edgar Granados hosts the Starlite Showcase in Sacramento, California on the night of March 11. (Photo by Luis Gael Jimenez)
Comedian Edgar Granados hosts the Starlite Showcase in Sacramento, California on the night of March 11. (Photo by Luis Gael Jimenez)

Granados introduced the first artist of the night: singer-songwriter Symytry, who played a somber set of songs that ended with an acapella rendition of his song “Empty Bodies” when his backing track failed.

If heartbreak had a sound, it would be called Symytry. Every song he played that night was filled with the kind of introspective self-analysis that only happens after a couple of beers into your first night being single.

Ase Royal, the aforementioned dashiki-wearing rapper, took the spotlight after Symytry left the stage. Royal turned the Starlite Lounge into his own personal rap video with a professional cameraman and a crew that pulled girls from all over the second-story barroom closer to the stage.

Royal rapped with ferocity and engaged the audience with thought provoking lyrics voicing his support for the Black Lives Matter movement.

The rap-heavy night continued after Royal left the stage with newcomer Alex Salveson taking the stage.

Just to get it out of the way, Salveson is definitely not your typical rapper. The 17 year-old, jogger-wearing, former Subway employee took the stage and it’s safe to say that nobody expected him to start rapping the way he did.

Rapper Alex Salveson performs at the Starlite Lounge on the night of March 11 as part of the Starlite Showcase in Sacramento, California. (Photo by Luis Gael Jimenez)
Rapper Alex Salveson performs at the Starlite Lounge on the night of March 11 as part of the Starlite Showcase in Sacramento, California. (Photo by Luis Gael Jimenez)

When Salveson picked up the microphone, the crowd jammed themselves up against the stage. What proceeded was probably the most unexpected reaction that anyone could have guessed: Salveson slayed it.

The teenager had the entire room begging him for an encore by the time he finished his last song. The encore he gave them, was not the encore they asked for though.

Instead of performing himself, Salveson handed the microphone to his dad, Andrew Salveson.

Yeah, his dad.

Andrew Salveson then proceeded to freestyle to a room where half the people’s jaws were on the floor.

How the hell do you follow a father and son rapping duo? By being Caliscope of course, the band that will be one of main acts at 98 Rock’s First Festival on May 6 and 7.

Caliscope sounds like California; like the kind of music you listen to while you’re drinking beers on a beach nobody knows about.

Their ultra-chill sound is a blend of rap and hip hop that won’t leave you cringing like your old Limp Bizkit fanboy days. It’s a genuinely impressive combination of two genres that have a history of mixing as well as bleach and ammonia.

Caliscope prepares to take the stage at the Starlite Lounge in Sacramento, California on the night of March 11. (Photo by Luis Gael Jimenez)
Caliscope prepares to take the stage at the Starlite Lounge in Sacramento, California on the night of March 11. (Photo by Luis Gael Jimenez)

After California’s musical ambassadors left the stage, the organizer of the Starlite Showcase took the stage: Sparks Across Darkness.

Sparks Across Darkness took the Starlite on a guided trip through the stars themselves with a form of hip hop that sounds like it was written on the International Space Station it’s so out of this world.

After Sparks Across Darkness, Jordan Moore walked onto the stage. Moore’s indie-folk inspired set stood out considerably against the rap-heavy lineup.

Moore writes the kind of music you would listen to after a breakup … if Moore hadn’t been the one who stole your girlfriend.

Jordan Moore performs at the Starlite Showcase in Sacramento, California on the night of March 11. Moore will be releasing his first EP "All Of These Oceans" in the next few weeks. (Photo by Luis Gael Jimenez)
Jordan Moore performs at the Starlite Showcase in Sacramento, California on the night of March 11. Moore will be releasing his first EP “All Of These Oceans” in the next few weeks. (Photo by Luis Gael Jimenez)

Moore’s voice has this sort of haunting melancholy to it that has a way of making you replay old memories in your head. Memories of a better time. A time before Moore stole your girlfriend.

The night began to wind itself down and the crowd began to dwindle but the acts kept coming.

Next to the Starlite stage was TIP Vicious. The rapper for the music fan who isn’t ashamed to drive a Prius. Vicious’ lyrical style is based out of raw honesty and unfiltered truth with a nice blend of humor thrown in.

Vicious’ set involved more crowd interaction than any other artist that night with guest performers, entire songs rapped from within the crowd and plenty of self-mockery thrown in for good measure.

When Vicious left the stage, Granados stepped into the spotlight once more to introduce the last entertainer of the night: Darealwordsound, the night’s resident DJ.

By this point in the night, most of the patrons had stumbled their way out of the Starlite Lounge. Only eight people remained by the time Darealwordsound grabbed a microphone and took center stage; the eight luckiest people in Sacramento.

Darealwordsound proceeded to lay down what was probably the most energy-intensive set of the night.

With a flow like the one that nearly broke the Oroville Dam, Darealwordsound had the crowd of eight yelling and hollering like a crowd of 50.

It was a sight to behold when he started yelling “Kamehame-” and the crowd reciprocated with a “-ha” that felt like it nearly tore the roof off of the Starlite Lounge.

By the time he left the stage, only a few stragglers remained.
Sparks Across Darkness will be attempting to make the Starlite Showcase a regular show at the Starlite Lounge.